How to Use Your Bujo for Self-Care: Reflection

Welcome to Week 8: Reflection of the Bullet Journal Challenge series! In case you missed it, the #BulletJournalChallenge announced on www.bulletjournal.com is the perfect way to find inspiration for all the ways you can use a bujo for self-care. The details of the challenge are here. My post about Week 7, professional care, can be found here.

This post contains affiliate links to Amazon.com.  If you purchase products from these links, I’ll earn a small commission at no extra cost to you.  To read my full disclosure statement, click here.

Reflection on the bullet journal challenge
7 Ways to Use Your Bullet Journal for Self-Care: Reflection

This week, I’ll round up a few of my favorite ideas from the challenge and share how the challenge has helped me decide which habits I want to keep track of in my weekly layouts.

Personal Care

Journaling

My favorite way to use my bujo for personal care is the journaling section of my traveler’s notebook.  Sometimes, I’ll decorate the pages, but this space is supposed to be for my benefit, so if I only want to write, I’ll use the pages either for a brain-dump or a regular journal entry.  If I’m feeling stuck or looking for inspiration, I use a journaling prompt.

Personal Care pages
Here’s my insert for journal entries in my traveler’s notebook.

Physical Care

Morning and Evening Routines

I’m not a huge fitness buff, though I enjoy doing gentle yoga and going on walks when the weather permits. I chose morning and evening routines because I think the way we start and finish our days has so much impact on our emotional and physical well-being.

If you’re at a loss for morning and evening routines, here are a few of my favorite ideas:

For mornings:

  • Morning pages
  • Eat breakfast
  • Prayer/devotion/mantra/setting intentions for the day
  • Exercise (walking, yoga, dancing, YouTube workout, etc.)
  • Spend five minutes reviewing your bujo and plans for the day
  • Listen to an inspiring TED talk (either as you get ready or on your commute)

For evenings:

  • No screen time two hours before bed
  • Journaling
  • Coloring
  • Reading
  • Exercise (walking, yoga, dancing, YouTube workout, etc.)
  • Morning pages”  (if your mornings are truly too crazy, you can write your pages at night)
  • Prepare for the next day (lay out clothes, prep meals, pack bag, etc.)
  • Go to bed at a reasonable hour

Psychological Care

Make a Not-To-Do List

Are you someone who needs to quit worrying about something or are you a chronic people pleaser? If so, this suggestion can be a powerful tool to help you. Make a page dedicated to all the things you want to stop doing. For example, you could write “I’m going to stop worrying about what people think of me” or “I’m going to stop putting myself last.” You could also use the Not-To-Do List to help you with a positive self-image and write “I’m going to stop feeling bad about my body.” The stories you tell yourself are more powerful than you may realize. Make sure the stories you are telling yourself help you become your best self.

Psychological Care
When creating your Not-To-Do List, it may help you to remember your “Why.”

Emotional Care

Mood Trackers

There are a few different ways you could incorporate mood trackers in your bujo. You could choose to record your mood in a tracker on your daily pages, weekly spreads, monthly pages, or make a separate page for tracking your mood for the entire year. I was inspired to use the My Year in Pixels idea that can be found on Pinterest and Instagram. Every day, I color each square the corresponding shade for each mood and as the year goes on, it’ll be fun to see all the different colors. So far, it has been a colorful start to my year!

My Year in Pixels
My Year in Pixels was already turning out to be so colorful even in February. I can’t wait to see what it looks like by the end of the year!

Environmental Care

Cleaning Schedules

There are a few ways you could use your bullet journal to keep your cleaning routine. You could make a separate page to refer to your master cleaning schedule for weekly and monthly tasks. I find it helpful to have my daily cleaning tasks as a part of my to-do list in my bujo, mixed in with my other action items for the day. Alternatively, in your weekly spread, you could make a checklist of all the cleaning tasks you want to accomplish that week and check off each item as you complete them. I personally can’t make my cleaning routines a floating list because I know if I don’t schedule my tasks for a certain day, I won’t get it done.

To simplify my cleaning routine, I follow Clean Mama‘s routine. As a blogger, writer, and mother, I don’t have a lot of time to devote to cleaning my house, so her easy-to-follow schedule helps me stay on track even on my busy days. I won’t go into her whole system because she does an amazing job of explaining it here.

This book has changed how I look at cleaning (and I’m not a domestic goddess.) If you purchase through my link, I’ll earn a small commission at no extra cost to you. I appreciate your support!

Social Care

Collections

There are a few different collections you could keep to help you with social care. My favorite way to do collections pages is to keep lists. Here are a few ideas to get you started:

  • Keep a contacts page with the names of people in your circle who support you. You should keep their contact information next to their name so that you can send them thank-you notes for their help.
  • While on the subject of contacts, you could keep a list of your immediate friends’ and family’s birthdays and other meaningful dates so that you can plan ahead.
  • Make a list of all the ways you show love to yourself, either through a written list or sketches.
  • Keep a page of happy memories to reflect on. You could either make this a written list, or if you’re feeling artistic, you could sketch the moments on your pages. You could also add photos to your page of happy moments.

Professional Care

Trackers

Depending on what your career is, there are many ways your bullet journal can help make your professional life easier. If you’re a project manager or engineer working on an assignment with several deadlines, you could create a tracker for your project’s key milestones. If you’re a fellow writer, I find that keeping a submission tracker helps me keep up with not only who I submitted my work to, but also when. This makes it so much easier for me to keep track of when I need to follow up with a piece I’ve submitted.

Other tracker ideas for helping your professional life:

  • If you’re on the hunt for a job, keep a tracker with the names of places you’re applying to and leave room for the date you first contacted them for the position. You could also write down relevant information about the company or the job on this page.
  • Bloggers, you could make a tracker for your page views, social media followers, and so much more! Blogging has so many numbers involved that having a tracker will help you so much when you’re looking to work with a brand for sponsored content. As time goes on, it’ll also serve as a record of how far you’ve grown.

For more tips on stress-free habit trackers, check out my post here.

Reflection on the Bullet Journal Challenge

weekly layout in bullet journal
A weekly layout from the beginning of April.

My biggest takeaway from the bullet journal challenge is that there is an infinite number of ways that I can be using my bujo to help me take better care of myself. After completing the challenge, I thought about which habits I most need help with keeping track of, and for the time being, I’ve narrowed it down to these five:

  • exercise
  • breathe
  • fiction
  • read
  • declutter

I still have been struggling to keep up with exercise, but for the purposes of my tracker I count dance parties with my two young children, yoga, and going on walks as exercise. As long as I do one of those things, I get to check off the box for the day.

I put “breathe” as one of my habits because it’s a simple, effective way to help me be mindful when I’m busy or stressed. This is especially useful if I don’t feel like doing a longer meditation. Sometimes, taking a minute to only focusing on breathing with the phone on silent and the tv off is all I need for a reset.

“Fiction” is on my list to help me remember my why. My first love is writing fiction and it’s easy for it to fall by the wayside as I work on the blog and get caught up in my everyday routine. Having it as part of my habit tracker holds me accountable.

It feels strange to have “read” on my list since I love reading so much, but lately, I’ve needed the reminder to read for fun. It’s nice having a relaxing hobby on my to-do list.

The last item in my habit tracker, “declutter,” is so important but can be difficult for me to remember to do sometimes. I struggle with the idea that decluttering doesn’t have to take a long time, and so what I’m trying to turn into a habit is setting a timer for 10 minutes and seeing how much decluttering I can get done in a short amount of time. This is an area I’m still working on but I’m confident my habit tracker will help me reach my goal.

Did you participate in the challenge? I’d love to hear your thoughts about it, especially if it inspired you to change how you use your bullet journal. Tell me about it in the comments section.

The Bullet Journal Challenge Series

If you’re interested in participating in the challenge on your own time, I’ve listed each week’s topic here:

If you’re on Instagram, make sure you follow the hashtag #BulletJournalChallenge for inspiration! Also, if you’re reading this long after the challenge is over, I encourage you to do the challenge anyway.  Self-care is so important to your overall well-being, and it’s never too late to start taking better care of yourself.

More Tools to Use Your Bujo for Self-Care

If you’re looking for more inspiration for using your bujo for self-care, sign up for my email list to receive free journaling prompts and printable quotes for your bujo. I’ll be adding more freebies, so check your inbox for updates!

7 Days of Journaling Prompts Renew Edition
7 Days of Journaling Prompts Renew Edition

Subscribe for printables + access




Reflection on the bullet journal challenge
7 Ways to Use Your Bullet Journal for Self-Care: Reflection

How to Use Your Bullet Journal for Self-Care: Professional Care

How to Use Your Bullet Journal for Self-Care: Professional Care
How to Use Your Bullet Journal for Self-Care: Professional Care

8 Ways Your Bujo Can Help Your Work Life

Welcome to Week 7: Professional Care of the Bullet Journal Challenge series! In case you missed it, the #BulletJournalChallenge announced on www.bulletjournal.com is the perfect way to find inspiration for all the ways you can use a bujo for self-care. The details of the challenge are here. My post about Week 6, social care, can be found here.

This week’s topic is professional care, which includes:

  • Work
  • Purpose
  • Finances

This post contains affiliate links to Amazon.com.  If you purchase products from these links, I’ll earn a small commission at no extra cost to you.  To read my full disclosure statement, click here.

Below are eight ways you can use your bullet journal for taking care of your professional care needs.

Work

Trackers

Depending on what your career is, there are many ways your bullet journal can help make your professional life easier. If you’re a project manager or engineer working on an assignment with several deadlines, you could create a tracker for your project’s key milestones. If you’re a fellow writer, I find that keeping a submission tracker helps me keep up with not only who I submitted my work to, but also when. This makes it so much easier for me to keep track of when I need to follow up with a piece I’ve submitted.

Other tracker ideas for helping your professional life:

  • If you’re on the hunt for a job, keep a tracker with the names of places you’re applying to and leave room for the date you first contacted them for the position. You could also write down relevant information about the company or the job on this page.
  • Bloggers, you could make a tracker for your page views, social media followers, and so much more! Blogging has so many numbers involved that having a tracker will help you so much when you’re looking to work with a brand for sponsored content. As time goes on, it’ll also serve as a record of how far you’ve grown.

For more tips on stress-free habit trackers, check out my post here.

Brain Dumps

A popular exercise to promote creative problem solving is to brainstorm 5-10 problems and solutions related to your work every day. If you don’t want to use your morning pages to do this exercise, you could use pages out of your bullet journal for brainstorming. Don’t forget to index these pages; you never know when one of your brainstorming sessions might hold the answer to a problem later on!

Calendars

If you’re a blogger or a writer, you could keep a copy of your editorial calendar in your bullet journal. Keeping an editorial calendar will help you always know what you need to write next and prevent you from wasting time brainstorming your next topic.

Other ways you can use your bullet journal’s calendar:

  • Make a note of important dates for your deadlines.
  • Keep track of conferences related to your profession. Even if you can’t attend, you know to be on the lookout for news related to the conference or convention.
  • Write down the dates for meetings and interviews. Even if you keep track of these on your phone or a digital calendar, you can be sure you won’t miss an important interview or meeting if your app fails.

Collections

Here are a few collection ideas that can help your professional life:

  • Make a collection of your accomplishments at work, so that when it’s time to update your resume, you don’t have to guess about the dates you reached milestones with your projects or won awards.
  • Make a list of your favorite professional development books, blogs, and podcasts.
  • Keep a physical contacts list of your top contacts such as previous employers, mentors, and other professional contacts so that you can always have this information ready. This saves so much time when applying for a new job or if you’re looking for leads for an assignment.
  • Make a page all about your dream job and ways you can work towards having it. You can use this page as motivation while you chase your dream.

Purpose

Collections

Here are a few ideas for collections to help you define your purpose:

  • Make a list of your favorite inspirational quotes. (Need help with this? Check out my post here for some of my favorite quotes and some free printable journaling cards!)
  • List your favorite personal development books, blogs, and podcasts. My personal favorite is The Artist’s Way, by Julia Cameron

If you purchase through my link, I’ll earn a small commission at no extra cost to you. I appreciate your support!

  • Write down your personal mission statement. This could be as silly or serious as you want. Below, you can see mine:
Personal Mission Statement
Personal Mission Statement in my commonplace book.

Journal

If you’re feeling adrift or the idea of writing down your personal mission statement sounds intimidating, you may benefit from journaling or doing morning pages for a few days to see if you notice any recurring themes in your personal life. If you’re new to journaling or in need of inspiration, subscribe to my email list for prompts and updates here.

Finances

Trackers

There are so many different ideas for financial trackers on Pinterest and Instagram. Just search for #savingstracker or #spendingtracker for inspirations. Here are some ideas for financial trackers:

  • Savings tracker: If you’re saving for a particular goal, like the down payment on a house, vacation, or a car, you could decorate the page to match the theme.
  • Spending tracker: You could do this a few different ways. You could either keep track of the amount of money you’re spending or if you’re trying to do zero spend days, you could keep track of the days you don’t spend money.
  • Bill tracker: You can keep track of bill due dates and amounts here. Make sure you leave room to check off when you’ve paid your bill.
  • Credit score tracker: If you’re working towards improving your credit score for a big loan such as a mortgage, you could keep track of your credit score from month-to-month here.

Collections

Do you need help staying motivated to keep up with your finances? Collections can help you. Here are a few ideas:

  • Make a note of your favorite blogs and podcasts on finances, saving, and budgeting.
  • Make a list of things you want to save for, both big and little. Don’t be afraid to dream big here!
  • Create a list of your favorite books on budgeting and finance. Mine is The Total Money Makeover, By Dave Ramsey

If you purchase through my link, I’ll earn a small commission at no extra cost to you. I appreciate your support!

The Bullet Journal Challenge Series

If you’re interested in participating in the challenge, I’ve listed each week’s topic here:

If you’re on Instagram, make sure you follow the hashtag #BulletJournalChallenge for inspiration! Also, if you’re reading this long after the challenge is over, I encourage you to do the challenge anyway.  Self-care is so important to your overall well-being, and it’s never too late to start taking better care of yourself.

More Tools to Use Your Bujo for Self-Care

If you’re looking for more inspiration for using your bujo for self-care, sign up for my email list to receive free journaling prompts and printable quotes for your bujo. I’ll be adding more freebies, so check your inbox for updates!

7 Days of Journaling Prompts Renew EditionSubscribe to my email list to receive your copy!

 

Subscribe for printables + access




Do you use your bullet journal to help your professional life? I’d love to hear your ideas in the comments!

How to Use Your Bullet Journal for Self-Care: Professional Care
How to Use Your Bullet Journal for Self-Care: Professional Care

 

How to Use Your Bullet Journal for Self-Care: Social Care

How to Use Your Bullet Journal for Self-Care: Social Care
How to Use Your Bullet Journal for Self-Care: Social Care

Welcome to Week 6: Social Care of the Bullet Journal Challenge series! In case you missed it, the #BulletJournalChallenge announced on www.bulletjournal.com is the perfect way to find inspiration for all the ways you can use a bujo for self-care. The details of the challenge are here. My post about Week 5, environmental care, can be found here.

This week’s topic is social care, which includes:

  • What are you doing to show yourself love
  • Happy moments to reflect on
  • Make a list of people who support your effort

This post contains affiliate links to Amazon.com.  If you purchase products from these links, I’ll earn a small commission at no extra cost to you.  To read my full disclosure statement, click here.

Below are three ways you can use your bujo for taking care of your social care needs.

3 Ways You Can Use Your Bujo for Social Care

Habit Trackers

In my layout this week, I left a space for “social” in my habit tracker to keep track of keeping in touch with friends and family once a day. My intent is not to simply click like on one of their posts but to check in with either a text, call, or private message once a day. I’m not always very good at keeping in touch with friends and family when I’m busy with my kids or my writing, so I’m thankful for this week’s theme for the challenge.

Bujo Weekly Layout
My layout for this week of the challenge.

You could also make a separate layout to keep track of friends and family if this is a habit you want to track long term. This is especially helpful for long-distance friendships and for those who want to have relationships go deeper than liking posts on social media.

If the idea of keeping a habit tracker sounds overwhelming, check out my post on keeping your habit tracking stress-free here.

Collections

There are a few different collections you could keep to help you with social care. My favorite way to do collections pages is to keep lists. Here are a few ideas to get you started:

  • Keep a contacts page with the names of people in your circle who support you. You should keep their contact information next to their name so that you can send them thank-you notes for their help.
  • While on the subject of contacts, you could keep a list of your immediate friends’ and family’s birthdays and other meaningful dates so that you can plan ahead.
  • Make a list of all the ways you show love to yourself, either through a written list or sketches.
  • Keep a page of happy memories to reflect on. You could either make this a written list, or if you’re feeling artistic, you could sketch the moments on your pages. You could also add photos to your page of happy moments.

Affirmations Page

If you don’t do affirmations in your morning pages, you could use a few pages out of your bujo to write down daily affirmations. If you don’t want to use a whole page devote to affirmations, you could always write down a daily affirmation on your weekly or daily pages. The important part of affirmations is that you remember to repeat it to yourself throughout the day. Don’t write it in the morning only to forget about it after a few hours. It may help you to revisit the page you wrote the affirmation on later in the day to keep it fresh in your memory. I recommend checking in with your bullet journal at lunch and just before bed if you can spare the time.

The Bullet Journal Challenge Series

If you’re interested in participating in the challenge, I’ve listed each week’s topic here:

If you’re on Instagram, make sure you follow the hashtag #BulletJournalChallenge for inspiration! Also, if you’re reading this long after the challenge is over, I encourage you to do the challenge anyway.  Self-care is so important to your overall well-being, and it’s never too late to start taking better care of yourself.

More Tools to Use Your Bujo for Self-Care

If you’re looking for more inspiration for using your bujo for self-care, sign up for my email list to receive free journaling prompts and printable quotes for your bujo. I’ll be adding more freebies, so check your inbox for updates!

Subscribe

Subscribe for printables + access




Bullet Journal Supplies

Here are my favorite tools for making my weekly layouts in my bujo. If you purchase anything from my links, I’ll earn a small commission at no extra fee for you. To read my full disclosure statement, click here.

How to Use Your Bullet Journal for Self-Care: Social Care
How to Use Your Bullet Journal for Self-Care: Social Care

How to Use Your Bujo for Self-Care: Environmental Care

7 Ways to Use Your Bujo for Self Care Environmental Care
7 Ways to Use Your Bujo for Self Care Environmental Care

Welcome to Week 5: Environmental Care of the Bullet Journal Challenge series! In case you missed it, the #BulletJournalChallenge announced on www.bulletjournal.com is the perfect way to find inspiration for all the ways you can use a bujo for self-care. The details of the challenge are here. My post about Week 4, emotional care, can be found here.

This week’s topic is environmental care, which includes:

  • Home
  • Embracing nature

This post contains affiliate links to Amazon.com.  If you purchase products from these links, I’ll earn a small commission at no extra cost to you.  To read my full disclosure statement, click here.

Below are seven ways you can use your bujo for taking care of your environmental care needs.

Home

1. Cleaning Schedules

There are a few ways you could use your bullet journal to keep your cleaning routine. You could make a separate page to refer to your master cleaning schedule for weekly and monthly tasks. I find it helpful to have my daily cleaning tasks as a part of my to-do list in my bujo, mixed in with my other action items for the day. Alternatively, in your weekly spread, you could make a checklist of all the cleaning tasks you want to accomplish that week and check off each item as you complete them. I personally can’t make my cleaning routines a floating list because I know if I don’t schedule my tasks for a certain day, I won’t get it done.

To simplify my cleaning routine, I follow Clean Mama‘s routine. As a blogger, writer, and mother, I don’t have a lot of time to devote to cleaning my house, so her easy-to-follow schedule helps me stay on track even on my busy days. I won’t go into her whole system because she does an amazing job of explaining it here.

This book has changed how I look at cleaning (and I’m not a domestic goddess.) If you purchase through my link, I’ll earn a small commission at no extra cost to you. I appreciate your support!

2. Decluttering Challenges

If you’re participating in an online decluttering challenge or you’re inspired by Marie Kondo’s book, The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing,  you could make a habit tracker specifically for completing the challenge. This would work for either its own separate layout and page or within your daily and weekly pages.

Weekly layout in bullet journal
My habit tracker this week includes a 10 minute declutter and on each day of the week, I have my daily cleaning task listed.

3. Home Projects/Spring Cleaning

If your home is about to undergo major renovations or you want to do a deep spring cleaning, you could make a separate layout to keep track of the projects you want to complete. If you’re feeling creative, you could draw the outline of a house and write in the tasks specific to each room.

My husband and I are looking to move in the near future, so I will be creating a layout based off of all of our to-do lists for getting our current house ready to list and our requirements for our new home. Stay tuned for updates to this post for pictures of the layout!

Embracing Nature

5. Observations from Walks

If you want to incorporate mindfulness with a healthy habit, recording your observations from going on walks is a great practice, whether you go walking alone in trails or in a more urban environment downtown. You could journal conversations you overheard, animals you spotted, or unusual plants you saw while out. If you’re unafraid of getting your bullet journal messy, you could keep pressed flowers or dried leaves from your walks taped to your pages.

6. Ideas for Beautifying Your Neighborhood

You could create a page for brainstorming ideas about volunteer opportunities, charities, or small acts you could do to help make your neighborhood a better place. You could break down the ideas by time commitment, from simple ideas such as bringing a trash bag with you on your next walk or visit the park to pick up litter to bigger projects, such as volunteering for cleaning up along the highway or a community volunteer day event.

7. Waste Reduction Ideas

If you’re looking to reduce the amount of waste you produce, you could devote a page about your goals. Break down your goal, whether it’s zero waste or simply wanting to produce less trash per week, into actionable steps. Start small, and give yourself time to reach your goals. You could use a habit tracker to keep yourself accountable while you work towards your end goal.

The Bullet Journal Challenge Series

If you’re interested in participating in the challenge, I’ve listed each week’s topic here:

If you’re on Instagram, make sure you follow the hashtag #BulletJournalChallenge for inspiration! Also, if you’re reading this long after the challenge is over, I encourage you to do the challenge anyway.  Self-care is so important to your overall well-being, and it’s never too late to start taking better care of yourself.

More Tools to Use Your Bujo for Self-Care

If you’re looking for more inspiration for using your bujo for self-care, sign up for my email list to receive free journaling prompts and printable quotes for your bujo. I’ll be adding more freebies, so check your inbox for updates!

Subscribe

Subscribe for free printables + updates




7 Ways to Use Your Bujo for Self Care Environmental Care
7 Ways to Use Your Bujo for Self Care Environmental Care

 

How to Use Your Bujo for Self-Care: Emotional Care

4 Ways to Use Your Bujo for Self-Care: Emotional Care
4 Ways to Use Your Bujo for Self-Care: Emotional Care

Welcome to Week 4: Emotional Care of the Bullet Journal Challenge series! In case you missed it, the #BulletJournalChallenge announced on www.bulletjournal.com is the perfect way to find inspiration for all the ways you can use a bujo for self-care. The details of the challenge are here. My post about Week 3, psychological care, can be found here.

This week’s topic is psychological care, which includes:

  • Things that bring you joy
  • How you reset
  • Tracking experiences and how you feel

This post contains affiliate links to Amazon.com.  If you purchase products from these links, I’ll earn a small commission at no extra cost to you.  To read my full disclosure statement, click here.

Below are four ways you can use your bujo for taking care of your emotional care needs.

Mood Trackers

There are a few different ways you could incorporate mood trackers in your bujo. You could choose to record your mood in a tracker on your daily pages, weekly spreads, monthly pages, or make a separate page for tracking your mood for the entire year. I was inspired to use the My Year in Pixels idea that can be found on Pinterest and Instagram. Every day, I color each square the corresponding shade for each mood and as the year goes on, it’ll be fun to see all the different colors. So far, it has been a colorful start to my year!

My Year in Pixels
My Year in Pixels is already turning out to be so colorful. I can’t wait to see what it looks like by the end of the year!

Other Habit Trackers

One of my habits this week in my tracker simply says, “breathe” to remind me to pause at least once a day and spend a few minutes each day only focusing on my breathing. This sounds easy enough, but it’s shockingly an easy thing to forget when you’re busy and taking care of two small children as I am. I find that after I do this mini-meditation I’m much calmer and relaxed.

If you find yourself frequently stressed and think that you don’t even have a few minutes to just breathe, then it’s even more important that you take the time to do it. You’ll thank yourself later. If the idea of keeping track of habits sounds too consuming to you, please read about how I keep my habit tracking stress-free here.

Weekly Layout for Emotional Care
This week’s habit tracker was all about emotional care. Even the simple reminder to take a moment to focus on only breathing has been so helpful.

Make Lists

I’m a big fan of list making. I think it’s a fun, simple way to journal and you can include so much information without it taking a lot of time. Lists you could make for your emotional self-care include:

  • Things that bring you joy, even if it’s as simple as a going on a walk.
  • How to reset your day when your feeling stressed or going badly for you. You could give yourself quick fixes like a playlist that always cheers you up or write down books to read when you’re feeling low.
  • Favorite memories of the month.
  • Funny quotes you overhead while out and about.

Document Your Days

Here are a few ways you could add documentation to your bujo:

  • Leave space in your daily or weekly pages to leave journal entries. If you’re worried that journaling every day sounds like a huge time commitment, write only a single line about your day each day.
  • Write a Week in Review either on your weekly pages or directly after the weekly pages. Jot down the highs and lows of the week, along with your favorite memories and events you attended.
  • Make pages entirely devoted to journaling. Index your entries by topic so that later you can quickly find pages about certain topics. You can revisit how you felt about certain days or events if you take the time to do this.
  • Take pictures with either a Polaroid Snap or print the ones from your phone and place them in your bujo with a dated note about the picture.

Here are my favorite tools for documenting pictures to include in my bujo and scrapbook. If you purchase anything from my links, I’ll earn a small commission at no extra fee for you. To read my full disclosure statement, click here.

The Bullet Journal Challenge Series

If you’re interested in participating in the challenge, I’ve listed each week’s topic here:

If you’re on Instagram, make sure you follow the hashtag #BulletJournalChallenge for inspiration! Also, if you’re reading this long after the challenge is over, I encourage you to do the challenge anyway.  Self-care is so important to your overall well-being, and it’s never too late to start taking better care of yourself.

More Tools to Use Your Bujo for Self-Care

If you’re looking for more inspiration for using your bujo for self-care, sign up for my email list to receive free journaling prompts and printable quotes for your bujo. I’ll be adding more freebies, so check your inbox for updates!Subscribe

Subscribe for free printables + updates!




4 Ways to Use Your Bujo for Self-Care: Emotional Care
4 Ways to Use Your Bujo for Self-Care: Emotional Care

How to Use Your Bujo for Self-Care: Psychological Care

4 Ways to Use Your Bujo for Self Care: Psychological Care
4 Ways to Use Your Bujo for Self Care: Psychological Care

Welcome to Week 3: Psychological Care of the Bullet Journal Challenge series! In case you missed it, the #BulletJournalChallenge announced on www.bulletjournal.com is the perfect way to find inspiration for all the ways you can use a bujo for self-care. The details of the challenge are here. My post about Week 2, physical care, can be found here.

This week’s topic is psychological care, which includes:

  • Relaxation
  • Creativity
  • What can you say “no” to?
  • How do you prioritize self-care when life is crazy?

This post contains affiliate links to Amazon.com.  If you purchase products from these links, I’ll earn a small commission at no extra cost to you.  To read my full disclosure statement, click here.

Below are four ways you can use your bujo for taking care of your psychological needs.

Habit Trackers

The most straightforward way to use your bujo for psychological care is to use your habit trackers to keep track of which creative pursuits or even simply track relaxation as a reminder to take some time to yourself. If creative pursuits are something you enjoy, but you haven’t made them part of your routine yet, start small. Don’t feel like you have to add a lot of new habits in one week. If you read the previous posts in the series, you know that I don’t track too many habits at a time. To read more about why I only track a few habits at a time, click here.

This week, the habits I made sure to include in my tracker were journaling, sketching, and writing fiction. I made a point of distinguishing writing fiction instead of only saying “write,” because I wanted to make the effort to work on my fiction projects that have had to sit on the back burner for the last few months (more on this later.)

Psychological Care
This week helped me focus on my “why”: why I blog, why I spend my time the way I do, and why I love to create.

Make a Not-To-Do List

Are you someone who needs to quit worrying about something or are you a chronic people pleaser? If so, this suggestion can be a powerful tool to help you. Make a page dedicated to all the things you want to stop doing. For example, you could write “I’m going to stop worrying about what people think of me” or “I’m going to stop putting myself last.” You could also use the Not-To-Do List to help you with a positive self-image and write “I’m going to stop feeling bad about my body.” The stories you tell yourself are more powerful than you may realize. Make sure the stories you are telling yourself help you become your best self.

Make a Page Dedicated to Relaxation

You could make a list of all the things you like to do to relax, including a list of books or shows you watch to help you unwind. In addition, you could list your essentials for relaxation, whether it’s bath bombs, magazines, favorite pair of cozy socks, or a peaceful coloring book. After you make your checklist of essentials, you could make a step-by-step guide to how you relax to look back on next time you’re feeling tense.

Here are a few of my essentials for relaxing. If you purchase products from these links, I’ll earn a small commission at no extra cost to you.  To read my full disclosure statement, click here.

More Ways to Use Your Bujo for Psychological Care

If life has been chaotic for you, keeping up with self-care and your own well-being can easily be neglected. If you fall into the trap of taking care of everyone else but ignoring your own needs, then you should consider making a “When was the last time I…” page in your bujo. At the top of the page, write out the phrase, “When was the last time I…” and underneath it, list out some of your favorite self-care practices that you have a hard time remembering to do. Next to each item listed, leave room for you to write the date after you complete it. The next time you feel worn out, return to the page and check to see if you’ve been neglecting yourself again.

I could have used a list like this over the last few months as my life became incredibly busy. I write fiction, but I was constantly letting my other responsibilities take priority over writing. It was making me feel restless, but I wasn’t aware at the time that was what was bothering me. During this week’s challenge, I revisited writing fiction, and though at first, I struggled to put pen to paper, afterward I felt much better than I had in weeks. Making a “When was the last time I…” page is high on my to-do list of collections to include in my bujo.

The Bullet Journal Challenge Series

If you’re interested in participating in the challenge, I’ve listed each week’s topic here:

If you’re on Instagram, make sure you follow the hashtag #BulletJournalChallenge for inspiration! Also, if you’re reading this long after the challenge is over, I encourage you to do the challenge anyway.  Self-care is so important to your overall well-being, and it’s never too late to start taking better care of yourself.

More Tools to Use Your Bujo for Self-Care

If you’re looking for more inspiration for using your bujo for self-care, sign up for my email list to receive free journaling prompts and printable quotes for your bujo. I’ll be adding more freebies, so check your inbox for updates!

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4 Ways to Use Your Bujo for Self Care: Psychological Care
4 Ways to Use Your Bujo for Self Care: Psychological Care

How to Use Your Bullet Journal for Self-Care: Physical Care

Physical Care
4 Ways to Use Your Bujo For Self-Care: Physical Care

Welcome to Week 2: Physical Care of the Bullet Journal Challenge series! In case you missed it, the #BulletJournalChallenge announced on www.bulletjournal.com is the perfect way to find inspiration for all the ways you can use a bujo for self-care. The details of the challenge are here. My post about Week 1, personal care, can be found here.

This post contains affiliate links to Amazon.com and kawaiilands.com.  If you purchase products from these links, I may a small commission at no extra cost to you.  To read my full disclosure statement, click here.

This week’s topic is physical care. This includes:

  • Health
  • Fitness
  • Beauty
  • Nutrition

This an area of self-care that I struggle with, especially when I’m feeling stressed, sick, or tired. Physical care is always the first thing to go when I’m feeling overwhelmed, but the prompt this week is making me pause to consider why I do this. With that said, here are some ways that you can use your bujo for physical care, plus a few ways I’ve used mine.

Habit Tracking

The most obvious way you can use your bujo for physical care is to create habit trackers specifically for exercise, nutrition, beauty, and health. If keeping track of habits are new to you, or you’re trying to start a new habit, I highly recommend starting small. If you want to start exercising, but you haven’t been physically active for a long time, start with a smaller goal of exercising for 20 minutes or even simply walking around the block a few times a week. The last thing you want to do when building a new habit is to burn out before you even get started.

Other habits you could track are your water intake, keeping track of medications or vitamins, days you use a skincare routine, or if fixing your hair or makeup is something you’d like to do, but don’t always do because of time or energy, you could keep track of that as well. It’s important that you don’t overdo it trying to track too much all at once if habit tracking is new to you. I talk extensively about why keeping simple habit trackers is a good idea here, but the main take away is you don’t want to sabotage your attempts at building good habits by making habit tracking a chore.

Physical Care
I keep my weekly habit tracker simple, functional, and small. If you want your own Totoro pencil case, watercolor washi tape, or cat pencils, go to www.kawaiilands.com and use my code simply10 for 10% off your order.

Morning and Evening Routines

As part of a challenge I participated in over the summer of 2017, I created a self-care planner in a Moleskin journal and I loved it. I  still use it to this day, though it’s starting to get full and I’m in the process of migrating important pages from the self-care planner to my traveler’s notebook. One of the things I made a page for a morning and evening routine. As you can see in the picture below, I haven’t quite decided on an evening routine yet (I’m still figuring out what works for me now that I have two children) but I wrote down an ideal morning routine.

Physical Care
When I finally figure out an evening routine that works for me, I’ll update my page or I’ll migrate it to my current traveler’s notebook.

If you’re at a loss for morning and evening routines, here are a few of my favorite ideas:

For mornings:

  • Morning pages
  • Eat breakfast
  • Prayer/devotion/mantra/setting intentions for the day
  • Exercise (walking, yoga, dancing, YouTube workout, etc.)
  • Spend five minutes reviewing your bujo and plans for the day
  • Listen to an inspiring TED talk (either as you get ready or on your commute)

For evenings:

  • No screen time two hours before bed
  • Journaling
  • Coloring
  • Reading
  • Exercise (walking, yoga, dancing, YouTube workout, etc.)
  • Morning pages”  (if your mornings are truly too crazy, you can write your pages at night)
  • Prepare for the next day (lay out clothes, prep meals, pack bag, etc.)
  • Go to bed at a reasonable hour

Make Resource Pages

A resource page would be like having a physical version of a Pinterest board in your bujo. You could list favorite exercise YouTube videos, your favorite health and fitness blogs, favorite healthy recipes, or books and magazines you want to read (or have read) about wellness. You could also make a list of challenges you want to partake in or accounts to follow that will help you with your health goals.

Exercise

Aside from using a habit tracker to hold yourself accountable to an exercise routine, you could print off or draw exercise routines and store them in a pocket on a page. I did this with some yoga routines that I found on Pinterest and I like how convenient it is to simply remove whatever routine I want to use. I don’t have to use my phone or computer to look up the routine, which for me, is a huge bonus because then I don’t get distracted before I start exercising.

Physical Care
I love using Pinterest to look for simple but effective yoga routines. Feel free to follow my boards here!

If you want to keep printed out routines in your bujo, too, here are some of my recommendations. If you purchase anything through my links, I’ll earn a small commission at no extra cost to you. I appreciate your support!

The Challenge

For me, the hardest part of this week’s challenge is actually following through with the pages I’ve made for physical care.  I don’t know how many times I’ve tried tracking exercise in my bujo, only to have it slide because of feeling too tired. I don’t personally keep track of the amount of sleep I get each night at this stage in my life because, at the time of this writing, I have a six-month-old that still likes to night feed. I talk more about how I decide which things I track here.

However, the Bullet Journal Challenge series has me rethinking how I feel about physical care. While exercise may not be a top priority for me, I do enjoy yoga and going on walks, so I’m going to make an effort to find ways to include my two young children in my physical care. Realistically, that is the only way I’m really going to make any sort of exercise routine work for me because if I have a moment to myself, I’d rather be writing, crafting, reading, or gaming (really, anything but exercise.) One thing that has started working for me is using playlists on YouTube to have dance parties with my three-year-old and finding mother and baby yoga videos to do with my 6-month-old.

The #BulletJournalChallenge Series

If you’re interested in participating in the challenge, I’ve listed each week’s topic here:

If you’re on Instagram, make sure you follow the hashtag #BulletJournalChallenge for inspiration! Also, if you’re reading this long after the challenge is over, I encourage you to do the challenge anyway.  Self-care is so important to your overall well-being, and it’s never too late to start taking better care of yourself.

More Tools to Use Your Bujo for Self-Care

If you’re looking for more inspiration for using your bujo for self-care, sign up for my email list to receive free journaling prompts and printable quotes for your bujo. I’ll be adding more freebies, so check your inbox for updates!

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Do you use your bujo to help with physical self-care? Do you have any tips on following through with your routines? I’d love to hear your advice in the comment section!

Physical Care
4 Ways to Use Your Bujo for Self-Care: Physical Care

How to Use Your Bullet Journal for Self-Care: Personal Care

Personal Care
How to Use Your Bujo for Self-Care

Are you making the most out of your bullet journal? One of the best parts of keeping a bujo is that you can easily use it as a tool for self-care. The #BulletJournalChallenge announced on www.bulletjournal.com is the perfect way to find inspiration for all the ways you can use a bujo for self-care. The details of the challenge are here.

Since I’m participating in the challenge, I was inspired to write a series about it. For the next eight weeks, I’ll go in-depth about the different aspects of self-care you can make pages for in your bujo. This week’s topic is personal care, which includes:

  • Journaling as self-care
  • What you enjoy doing for your “me time”
  • Ways to treat yourself
  • Creating lists for ways to turn around a bad day, morning/evening routines, and other self-care related lists.

Ways You Can Use Your Bujo for Personal Care

Journaling

My favorite way to use my bujo for self-care is the journaling section of my traveler’s notebook.  Sometimes, I’ll decorate the pages, but this space is supposed to be for my benefit, so if I only want to write, I’ll use the pages either for a brain-dump or a regular journal entry.  If I’m feeling stuck or looking for inspiration, I use a journaling prompt.

Personal Care pages
Here’s my insert for journal entries in my traveler’s notebook.

Listing

Another way you can use your bujo for personal care is to keep lists. Some people like to make lists of things to do when they’re having a bad day, morning routines, evening routines, or even things that make them happy. I find that having a list of things I’d like to do on an ideal day off not only gives me something fun to daydream about but when I do have a rare day to myself, I already have an idea of what I’d like to do. I don’t waste any time figuring how I want to spend the day, only to have it end before I could make the most of it.

Personal Care
I started a separate journal in July 2017 for self-care. This is one of my favorite list pages.

Habit Trackers

Finally, another way to use your bujo for personal care is to use your habit tracker to keep up with your self-care habits.  I talk about habit trackers more in this post here. Currently, all of my habits I’m tracking relate to self-care. One of the things I’m tracking this week is making sure that I journal. If I don’t plan on time to journal or keep track when I do it, it becomes easy to let it slide. If I’m not keeping up with my morning pages, I also include a  spot in my habit tracker for doing those as well.

Personal Care
My weekly habit tracker isn’t elaborate, but it’s effective. I like having my weekly tracker on the same page as the layout so that I can see everything at a glance.

The #BulletJournalChallenge Series

If you’re interested in participating in the challenge, I’ve listed each week’s topic here:

If you’re on Instagram, make sure you follow the hashtag #BulletJournalChallenge for inspiration! Also, if you’re reading this long after the challenge is over, I encourage you to do the challenge anyway.  Self-care is so important to your overall well-being, and it’s never too late to start taking better care of yourself.

More Tools to Use Your Bujo for Personal Care

If you’re looking for more inspiration for using your bujo for self-care, sign up for my email list to receive free journaling prompts and printable quotes for your bujo. I’ll be adding more freebies, so check your inbox for updates!

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How do you use your bujo for personal care? Let me know in the comments. I’d love to hear about it!

Personal Care
How to Use Your Bujo for Self-Care: Personal Care

Use Stress-Free Habit Trackers for Practical Self-Care

 

Journal and Pen
Make Habit Trackers Work for You Stress-Free

This post contains affiliate links to Amazon.com.  If you purchase products from these links, I’ll earn a small commission at no extra cost to you.  To read my full disclosure statement, click here.

What Are Habit Trackers?

Habit tracking is one of the reasons many people keep a bullet journal or bujo instead of a traditional planner.  If you search on Pinterest or Instagram for the hashtag #bujo or #habittracker, you’ll find hundreds of different habits people want to keep track of, from health habits such as water intake or logging hours of sleep to no spend days or time on social media.  They are valuable tools for trying to create good routines or break a bad habit.

If you’re unfamiliar with the bullet journal system, I encourage you to go read about it from the creator of the bujo, Ryder Carroll, here. I love the system because it’s so customisable and I plan on writing a future post about how I have mine set up since, like many bujo enthusiasts, my bullet journal doesn’t look exactly like the original concept.

Keeping Track of Your Habits Doesn’t Have to be Complicated

If you spend any amount of time searching for habit trackers or bujo layouts on Pinterest or Instagram, you’re bound to come across several gorgeous, intricate designs.  I have a board dedicated to these inspirational pages here.  Sometimes, though, I’ll come across a Pin that leaves me feeling intimidated, featuring habit trackers with over 30 items listed and fully illustrated. I don’t know about you, but the idea of having to check off so many things every single day sounds overwhelming. As a writer and work-at-home mother of two young children (3-years-old and 5-month-old at the time of this writing), my time is limited. Someday, I would love to try one of the many extensive trackers I’ve looked at, but right now, it’s not how I want to spend my time.

This is hard to admit, but I’m not sure if detailed tracker would work for me even if I wasn’t so busy.  When I try to change too many things at once, I tend to fail. I become discouraged by the lack of progress and nothing changes. When building new habits and routines, I have to start small and gradually work towards my end goal.  That’s why I’m currently tracking six habits in my weekly spread and have one year-long tracker for my mood.

Bullet Journal with Simple Habit Tracker
Weekly Layout from My Bujo.  This week featured my one little word for the year.

How I Use Weekly Habit Trackers

I’ve simplified how I use habit trackers since switching to a traveler’s notebook. The narrower pages for my weekly layouts made it an easy decision.  Each week, I think about what habits I want to maintain, which ones I’d like to start doing, and what I’d like to stop doing. I make an effort to keep the list short so that I don’t put too much pressure on myself.

My current list of six habits for the week are yoga, dance, read, write, journal, and craft. I’m trying to start an easy exercise routine, so I’m attempting to get back into yoga. I also want to teach my kids healthy habits, so I make an effort to have 20-minute dance parties with them. It makes exercising much more fun for me.  The last four habits are a mix of things I hope will help me professionally and keep me focused on self-care.

One final note about my weekly habit tracker: I’m not afraid to change what goes on the list. I used to track my morning pages and bedtime. However, I was consistently doing my morning pages, so I didn’t feel the need to continue tracking that habit. If I start slipping in that area, I’ll add it back to the list. I stopped keeping track of my bedtime because it was demoralizing. My baby still keeps me up at night and logging these long nights aren’t helping me. I’ll try tracking this habit again in a few months.

How I Use a Year Long Habit Tracker

Mood Tracker
My Year in Pixels page, heavily inspired by the many other mood trackers on Pinterest and Instagram.

I saw several variations of the My Year in Pixels mood tracker on Pinterest and fell in love with the idea. I’m a gamer and a nerd at heart, so I immediately knew that was going to go into my bujo this year.  I’m happy to report that so far, I’m off to a good start this year (even if I woke up grumpy on New Year’s Day.)

Close up of Habit Tracker
Closer view of My Year in Pixels mood tracker.

More Tips for Simplifying Your Habit Trackers

Here are a few more ideas to help you get started or simplify habit tracking:

  • Don’t be afraid to start small. If the idea of keeping track of seven things every day sounds overwhelming, don’t do it! Try keeping track of only one thing, such as water intake, doing morning pages, or no spend days.
  • If you’re consistently doing a habit every day, you may consider removing it from your habit tracker to free up space. Unless, of course, you want to keep it on the list because you love checking it off every day. There’s nothing wrong with that!
  • If you keep listing a habit in your tracker and never do it, consider why you feel the need to continue giving it a place in your habit tracker. Is it really a habit you actually want to have, or do you only think you should have it? You may be trying to be something you’re not. Don’t be afraid of removing a habit from your tracker- I did it!
  • If you genuinely want to start doing a habit but haven’t successfully done it yet, you need to take an honest look at your routine to see how you can make it happen. Maybe breaking the habit into smaller pieces (like attempting it once a week instead of every day) would help you get started.

As you start using habit trackers, you may decide a more detailed habit tracker. I don’t think there’s anything wrong with wanting to keep track of several things. It isn’t for me right now and that’s okay. Maybe someday it will be, and I’ll write a post called “Why Super-Detailed Habit Trackers are Awesome!” In the meantime, I’ll stick to admiring other people’s layouts online.

Tools I Use for My Habit Trackers

Here are a few supplies I love to use in my habit trackers. If you purchase anything through my links, I’ll earn a small commission at no extra cost to you.

  

What kinds of habits do you keep track of in your bujo? Do you prefer to track several habits at once or only a few at a time? I’d love it if you share what works for you in the comment section.

Bullet Journal
Make Habit Trackers Work for You Stress Free

Why You Should Do Morning Pages (Even if You’re Busy)

Morning Pages
Why You Should Do Morning Pages (Even If You’re Busy)

This post contains affiliate links to Amazon.com.  If you purchase products from these links, I’ll earn a small commission at no extra cost to you.  To read my full disclosure statement, click here.

What Are Morning Pages?

I first read about morning pages in Julia Cameron’s famous book, The Artist’s Way. The concept is brilliant in its simplicity: before your day begins, free-write three pages in a journal, notebook, or if neither of those options is available, you could even use three scrap pieces of paper. The catch is, you can’t think too hard about what you’re writing. This is critical for morning pages to work properly, but it’s especially hard as a writer to not worry about punctuation or subject matter.

It took me a few attempts when I first started doing morning pages, but after making it a habit, it became easier to ignore my inner critic who worried too much about the quality of my simple journaling. If I didn’t know what to write on a particular morning, sometimes I would simply write, “I have nothing to say,” until the words finally came pouring out. This has been especially useful on days when I have writer’s block (more on this later.)

The second component to making morning pages work is to not immediately read what you have written that morning. Let it rest. In her book, Julia Cameron suggests not reading your journal for several weeks. I’m glad I followed that advice. After weeks had passed since I wrote my first entries, it made it easier for me to have a clearer perspective about how I was feeling at the time of the writing. For example, it’s much easier to read about a difficult time you went through after weeks have passed rather than too soon when the pain is still raw. It’s true that some things will still hurt, but at least for me, I found it to be therapeutic to revisit old entries.

The final, vital part of making morning pages work is to make it a habit. They work so much better if you make it a part of your morning routine. You have more material to work with later when you do actually read the pages and it becomes easier to write without worry the more you do morning pages. It’s also important to eventually read the pages to see if there are any recurring thoughts or themes that you need to address. You may find in your pages that you have a project you want to start or changes in your life that you want to make. Reviewing your morning pages can be a very helpful tool for goal setting.

How Morning Pages Have Helped Me

When I made my first attempts at morning pages, I was skeptical. I have always loved journaling, but at the time, I didn’t think that I would have much to say right after waking up. I felt silly writing, “I have nothing to say,” or complaining about whatever what bothering me for three solid pages if I woke up in a bad mood. But then a curious thing happened after a while: my morning pages were starting to flow more easily. Suddenly, it was as if someone had opened the gates to my subconsciousness and I wrote about things, both good and bad, that I didn’t even realize were weighing on me. It was an eye-opening experience to review those entries, and it helped me make necessary changes in my life to feel happier and more fulfilled.

While I’m still very much a work in progress, it gives me peace of mind to use my morning pages as a safe place for me to check in with how I’m feeling. Not every entry is filled with profound meaning, but they still serve a secondary purpose that has also helped me tremendously. Making it a habit to free-write every day before any other writing takes place has reduced my writer’s block. It feels good being able to write without any sort of pressure of it being good or meaningful. It almost feels like clearing the cobwebs from my mind, and I’m much more relaxed when I sit down to write later on in the day.

Journal with pen and coffee
Highly idealized morning pages set up. Maybe someday this will be the reality, but not today!

Expectation vs Reality

When I picture doing my morning pages, I envision waking up early to a sleeping, peaceful household, making myself an iced coffee, and sitting down to leisurely do my morning pages. The reality is, that isn’t going to happen during the particular season of life that I’m in. I have two young children, a 3-year-old and a breastfeeding baby that still occasionally wakes up for nighttime feedings. On top of that, I have never been a morning person. The idea of waking up early when I’m already tired horrifies me. Here is my typical routine:

  • Wake up to the alarm clock (or more likely, my youngest wakes me up, wanting to eat.)
  • Make my iced coffee.  This step is essential.  If I don’t have my coffee, I won’t be able to get anything done.
  • If my husband has to go to work, I make breakfast. Otherwise, on his days off, my husband usually makes breakfast for everyone while I feed the baby.
  • After breakfast, I set a timer on my phone for 10 minutes. My oldest knows that when I have my timer set to keep himself entertained while I write unless he needs help. I’m very lucky that he’s so sweet about it. When I’m writing, he says, “Momma’s coloring.”
  • When I’m all done, it’s back to reality as a stay-at-home mother to my little ones until their nap time, which I use as my primary writing time.

More often than not, I’m writing my morning pages with my baby across my lap while my oldest is playing nearby, sometimes loudly, but always enthusiastically. It may not be the ideal, tranquil way that Julia Cameron intended, but doing my pages does give me clarity about my needs and what I want to accomplish for the day. Maybe someday, when my children are older, I will do my morning pages the proper way. For now, this works for me, and I’ll enjoy my little bit of extra sleep in the morning.

Make Morning Pages Work For You

Keeping in mind that I don’t do my morning pages exactly the proper way, here are a few practical tips for finding time to write your own pages:

  • Instead of checking your email or social media first thing in the morning, write your pages. It’s amazing how easy it is to fall down the rabbit hole of mindlessly scrolling. You may even find you have more time in the morning if you don’t check email or social media during breakfast.
  • Before you go to bed at night, set your notebook or journal out where you plan on using it in the morning. Make it a convenient location- you don’t want to hunt down your materials every day.
  • If you are running short on time in the mornings, consider setting your alarm clock ten to fifteen minutes early. You shouldn’t need more than a few minutes to free-write. (I know this is advice I will never take myself, but maybe it will help out one of you, my readers.)
  • If mornings are truly too chaotic for you to even think about writing, consider making your morning pages your nightly pages and write them at bedtime as a way to unwind. You could also spend part of your lunch break writing your pages as a midday check-in, but take care to guard your privacy if you choose this route. You don’t want to worry about co-workers peeking over your shoulders while you’re writing. I would suggest only doing this in your car or if you have your own office where you can write undisturbed and as a last resort if you have no other free time.

More About the Artist’s Way

I could easily go on about how much The Artist’s Way helped me get through a terrible creative slump. In fact, it will probably be the focus of a future blog post. If you are interested in reading more about finding or rediscovering your creativity, I highly recommend this book!  If you purchase a copy through my link, I’ll earn a small commission at no extra cost to you.  I’ve also included links to journals that I have loved using if you want to keep your morning pages in a beautiful home.

   

Why You Should Do Morning Pages (Even If You're Busy) Journal with iced coffee and pen
Why You Should Do Morning Pages (Even If You’re Busy)